Posted by: Indonesian Children | August 7, 2010

The Relationship Between Different Measures of Oral Reading Fluency and Reading Comprehension in Second-Grade Students Who Evidence Different Oral Reading Fluency Difficulties

Reports

The Relationship Between Different Measures of Oral Reading Fluency and Reading Comprehension in Second-Grade Students Who Evidence Different Oral Reading Fluency Difficulties

Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools Vol.41 340-348 July 2010. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0093)
© American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Justin C. Wise
Rose A. Sevcik
Robin D. Morris

Georgia State University, Atlanta

Maureen W. Lovett
Hospital for Sick Children/University of Toronto, Canada Maryanne Wolf
Tufts University, Medford, MA Melanie Kuhn
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ Beth Meisinger
University of Memphis, TN Paula Schwanenflugel
University of Georgia, Athens Contact author: Justin Wise, Department of Psychology, P.O. Box 5010, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302. E-mail: psyjcwx@langate.gsu.edu // <![CDATA[
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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether different measures of oral reading fluency relate differentially to reading comprehension performance in two samples of second-grade students: (a) students who evidenced difficulties with nonsense-word oral reading fluency, real-word oral reading fluency, and oral reading fluency of connected text (ORFD), and (b) students who evidenced difficulties only with oral reading fluency of connected text (CTD). Method: Participants (ORFD, n = 146 and CTD, n = 949) were second-grade students who were recruited for participation in different reading intervention studies. Data analyzed were from measures of nonsense-word oral reading fluency, real-word oral reading fluency, oral reading fluency of connected text, and reading comprehension that were collected at the pre-intervention time point. Results: Correlational and path analyses indicated that real-word oral reading fluency was the strongest predictor of reading comprehension performance in both samples and across average and poor reading comprehension abilities. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that real-word oral reading fluency was the strongest predictor of reading comprehension and suggest that real-word oral reading fluency may be an efficient method for identifying potential reading comprehension difficulties. KEY WORDS: oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, oral reading fluency difficulties, elementary school–age students 

Supported By

 CHILDREN SPEECH CLINIC Yudhasmara Foundation

Office ; JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia 10210  phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646 email : judarwanto@gmail.com, http://clinicalpediatric.wordpress.com/ 

Clinic and Editor in Chief : Dr WIDODO JUDARWANTO

 phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 62(021) 5703646, mobile : 0817171764 email : judarwanto@gmail.com  curriculum vitae

 

Copyright © 2010, Children Speech Clinic  Information Education Network. All rights reserved


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